Mercy Fund

From its beginning in 1838, Christ Church has been committed to helping the poor and sick in Jerusalem and surrounding lands.  This commitment to help the needy in this part of the world began with people in England reading the gospels. Many of the founders and early pioneers of Christ Church were leading British 19th century social reformers:  Lord Shaftesbury, William Wilberforce and Hannah More.

CMJ built hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, workshops, schools and vocational training centers. At the same time, they fed the poor, aides orphans, worked to improve the status of Jews in Jerusalem, and took an active stand against anti-Semitism.  Over the years many Druze, Christian and Muslim Arabs, Armenians, and refugees also benefited from CMJ schools and hospitals.

Today, Israelis and Palestinians do not need hospitals, clinics or workshops. Yet the poor are still with us – especially among the believing community. So the Christ Church Mercy Fund helps those who “fall between the cracks” and can’t get help from their governments or other NGOs.

Priorities of the Christ Church Mercy Fund
A woman begs outside the Old City Walls near the Jaffa Gate. Photo by Albert Ter Harmsel via Flickr (CC).

1. Helping local believers (Messianic Jews and Christians) who can’t meet expenses due to low salaries and/or emergencies.

2. Helping local people with the bureaucracy who are not able to work to ensure that they get the government benefits or legal help they need.

3. Helping local institutions that help and promote reconciliation amongst all communities of Jerusalem, such as Shevet Achim, St. Louis Hospital and others.

4. Helping the sick with medical expenses, transportation to doctors, hospitals and drugs not covered by health insurance.

5. Helping those who are not believers (Jews and Arabs) with the above but working through government social workers.

6. Helping believers in times of war.

7. Helping women (often Russians and Ukrainians) escape the sex trade in Israel and start new lives.

The Christ Church Mercy Fund seeks to reflect God’s character of mercy and goodness by helping those in need and is not used as a means to sway anyone to change their religion or church allegiance.

In recent years Christ Church has also been active in helping refugees from Africa (living in Israel) as well as the victims of war in Syria and Iraq, but funds for these projects are raised separately and do not come from the Mercy Fund.